Brookfield Central Tyro

Science Olympiad State concludes

Sophie+LaRose+%28%2719%29+and+Bonnie+Jin+%28%2719%29+team+up+for+Disease+Detectives%2C+one+of+the+first+events+of+the+day.+The+event+consists+of+a+written+exam+in+which+participants+are+asked+to+answer+some+questions+on+public+health+and+common+diseases%2C+analyze+an+actual+or+hypothetical+outbreak%2C+identify+patterns+with+a+provided+set+of+data%2C+and+prose+prevention+strategies.+This+is+the+third+year+LaRose+and+Jin+have+participated+in+this+particular+event
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Science Olympiad State concludes

Sophie LaRose ('19) and Bonnie Jin ('19) team up for Disease Detectives, one of the first events of the day. The event consists of a written exam in which participants are asked to answer some questions on public health and common diseases, analyze an actual or hypothetical outbreak, identify patterns with a provided set of data, and prose prevention strategies. This is the third year LaRose and Jin have participated in this particular event

Sophie LaRose ('19) and Bonnie Jin ('19) team up for Disease Detectives, one of the first events of the day. The event consists of a written exam in which participants are asked to answer some questions on public health and common diseases, analyze an actual or hypothetical outbreak, identify patterns with a provided set of data, and prose prevention strategies. This is the third year LaRose and Jin have participated in this particular event

Wisconsinso.org

Sophie LaRose ('19) and Bonnie Jin ('19) team up for Disease Detectives, one of the first events of the day. The event consists of a written exam in which participants are asked to answer some questions on public health and common diseases, analyze an actual or hypothetical outbreak, identify patterns with a provided set of data, and prose prevention strategies. This is the third year LaRose and Jin have participated in this particular event

Wisconsinso.org

Wisconsinso.org

Sophie LaRose ('19) and Bonnie Jin ('19) team up for Disease Detectives, one of the first events of the day. The event consists of a written exam in which participants are asked to answer some questions on public health and common diseases, analyze an actual or hypothetical outbreak, identify patterns with a provided set of data, and prose prevention strategies. This is the third year LaRose and Jin have participated in this particular event

Niyati Hansaria, Reporter

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There were a great majority of students who represented Brookfield Central High School at the Science Olympiad State Competition on March 16th. Participants from more than 45 schools all across Wisconsin met at the University of Wisconsin-Stout, with the hopes of showing off their scientific prowess. The competition included up to 36 different events, if not more.

Students were required to come prepared to display their knowledge in a vast amount of topics, ranging from computer coding and robotics, to protein modeling and human body systems – including everything in between. Though the preparations and hard work the students put in paid off, the road to qualify and perform at their highest wasn’t an easy one.

The competition started off with a regional qualifier that happened 2-3 months in advance at the University of Milwaukee. Students participating were required to demonstrate proficiency in areas such as being able to perform laboratory experiments in a chemistry-oriented environment, build and program their own mechatronic devices, construct an architecture and engineering-oriented design (much like Rube Goldberg) to accomplish a task, and take tests assessing their knowledge of human anatomy and physiology, along with those of other species in the animal kingdom. Teams of two people covered every category and rounds lasted the entire day, as students braved the freezing cold weather and rushed across every inch of the vast campus trying to reach events on time.

“It was an intense amount of pressure and nerves all bundled up into a weekend full of science and engineering,” recollects Jahnavi Hansaria, one of the competitors who qualified for the State Science Olympiad Competition.

After passing the regional qualifier, the pressure only increased. The intensity that came with state was even greater, and this time 16 students would have to cover the 30+ events that would take place the day of competition. Students gathered on a bus and withstood a 4-hour long ride to the Stout campus the Friday before the actual event. Upon reaching, the preparations began and the weekend passed by filled with tests, lab coats, numbers, and equations.

Although the event was an experience filled with celebration and weekend with friends, there were disappointments too. The Brookfield Central team did not place for any of the events, thus making the journey bittersweet. However, the defeat only made them more determined and encouraged to perform better for future years – and to encourage others interested in science to join the club.

Manasvi Paturu, a sophomore who competed in this year’s regional event supports this.“Science Olympiad is something that all students should consider participating in because you don’t necessarily have to be very good at a certain event to compete in it. It’s a great way to experience something new and make friends – while learning things along the way.”

Congratulations to all of this years regional and state participants!

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The student news site of Brookfield Central High School in Brookfield, Wisconsin
Science Olympiad State concludes